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 Post subject: MPi-KM-72 Conversion Guide (Pic heavy)
PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2012 7:27 pm 
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DOSAAF
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Joined: Fri Oct 15, 2010 11:23 am
Posts: 339
Location: NJ
I wrote this up for the East Wind forums.  I'd like to share this here too if nobody minds.  It's picture heavy.

Oh lols.  This was fun.  A pain in the butt at times, but I am quite happy with the results!

Having barely owned my LCT Economy AKM for almost 24 hours, I, over the course of 3 and a half hours, converted her to a rock solid MPi-KM-72 using a parts kit I picked up online.

The big thing about this whole conversion is to TAKE YOUR TIME!  File, test fit, file a little more, test fit, file some more, test fit, etc.  The whole thing should be able to hold itself without screws, and in my case, the stock needs to be hit with a mallet to fit properly.  I am able to pick the gun up by the stock and shake it, and the gun will not fall away from the stock, without any screws holding it together!  Super tight tolerances will lead to a rock solid build that will love you long time.

And with that, let's get to work!

Get yourself an AKM.  There are several good ones out there.  I opted for LCT's Economy AKM NV.  I can't tell any of the differences between the Economy externals and the rest of my guns, and the plastic furniture I don't care about anyway.

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There are some differences in the receiver markings, front sight tower, and gas tube, but for our purposes, these differences are negligible.  The goal is to have it look like an MPi-KM-72 from 3 feet away, and that mission has been accomplished.

It may be obvious, but the goal of the project is to swap the flash hider, foregrip halves, and stock out with those of an MPi-KM-72 kit.  Here is a side by side comparison of the foregrip.

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Here's a lineup of the stock.  The stock is the worst part of this whole project.  As such, if you opt to build the MPi-KMS-72, you can skip the stock part and call it a day!

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Here is the Slant muzzle break and magwell spacer I'm going to install.

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You're going to need some tools.  This isn't necessarily all of them.  The electronics stuff is because I'm also going to wire it to Deans.

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You'll also need standard AEG take down tools, namely allen keys pliers.  Note that on LCT guns, they like to switch between Metric and Standard for no reason, so, have them ready if you too are choosing to use an LCT base gun.

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Okay, crack your knuckles, let's start with the hard part.

Here we have our -14mm threaded muzzle nut.  If you're building an Older MPi-KM-72, this is okay,  The older one uses a wooden foregrip.  Since I'm going with plastic and Bakelite, I must get rid of it.

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Remove the nut, install the slant.

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The NV takedown is awesome.  Lift the gas tube release lever, lift the gas tube off the gun.  Flip the little lever holding the lower foregrip in place and slide that part forward, remove the cleaning rod, and remove the lower foregrip from the gun.

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Little lever on the right:

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If you forget the cleaning rod like me, then you are also special!

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Shun these parts, or pawn them off to a noob in the for sale area.

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Looks like we're gonna have quite a bit of filing to make this fit inside the gun.

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Front isn't looking too bad.  I do like the springy part built into the MPi foregrip.  The nice part is, it does work and helps keep everything solid.

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No filing necessary!  The front part of the bottom foregrip will slip in with some force.  Nice and snug is the goal!

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The back end of the bottom foregrip shall be where we spend the next half an hour filing to fit.  The sides don't need it as much as the top.  The bottom should only be filed enough just to make sure it will smoothly enter the hole in the receiver.

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We don't wanna take much off the bottom, to ensure a smooth fit.

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Buy yourself a set of craftsman files, the small kind.  They are the perfect width for this project!

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You just need to take a tiny bit off the sides to make sure it fits inside the receptacle in the receiver.  Just enough to scuff up the smooth bakelite surface.

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Always always always always test fit!  Even without the top part being the correct size, I can get the bottom to snugly sit inside the receiver.  At this point, I will concentrate on the top and not focus on the sides anymore.

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Here's a side by side of the plastic foregrip and the bakelite one.  Not a whole lot of work needs to be done, but that 1mm makes a difference.

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A better shot of how much material needs to be removed.  Note that not all of it needs to go, just enough to get it to fit in the receiver.

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If you are lucky enough to own a set of calipers, you can save yourself several file and test fit sessions by just measuring what you need to do.  Here we see the plastic foregrip at 1.1mm.

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A little hard to see, but using the internal measuring side of the calipers, we can see the size of the hole in the receiver.

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Looks like we've got about half a milimeter to go.  Just keep filing and test fitting.  Patience is key here.

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I'm not removing a whole ton of material, given the pile on the workbench.

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Still more to go.  If you are using calipers, make sure you measure across the whole thing, to ensure you're filing evenly.

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Once you hit that magic number, she will slide in, but you will have to shove.  This is better than having the piece fall right in and flop around.

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A very very tiny gap is visible.  I opted not to file any more, as I am looking for a very tight fit.  This gap ensures that the front half of the foregrip will engage the retaining mechanism and not slide front to back.

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The retaining mechanism requires a good shove to get into position, but once the locking lever is down (toward the rear) it isn't going anywhere.  There is a bit of a gap on this end too.  If I removed the gap at the rear end, this gap would be even larger.  Fortunately, it's a snug fit, and I left that spring on the front, which will keep the foregrip from shifting around.

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On to the upper foregrip.  Here's a blurry comparison of the LCT black plastic and real issue brown plastic.  Damn close looking.

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The other end.

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Shove the new upper foregrip on the gas tube and twist, to get it to slip into the front and back retaining rings.  When you reach about 80% of the way there, it will seem impossible to turn by hand.  Grab a set of pliers, and holding the gas tube, you can force the foregrip the rest of the way.

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With the upper foregrip lined up, reinstall the gas tube onto the rifle.

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Theres a bit of a gap between the upper and lower foregrip halves.  I blame the difference between airsoft sizing and real steel sizing.  However, these foregrips are cut for venting, unlike the LCT AKM grips that were on it previously.

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Upside down for no reason.  Dat Gap.

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Now, if you're doing an MPi-KMS-72 conversion, you're done!  The foregrip and flash hider have been mounted.  Continue reading if you're installing the full stock.  Be warned, this was the most time consuming part of the install.

The stock.  Ugh.  A bit of a pain in the ***.  If you have a drill press, not so much I imagine.

Here's the black plastic stock over the MPi stock.  Everything visible needs to be hacked off.

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While the MPi stock is very hollow and fairly spacious, it definitely could accommodate a LiPo battery.  I am instead opting to re-wire the gun to the upper receiver, since most of my guns are wired that way anyway.  I am also going to wire it to Deans.

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After a quick breakdown of the rifle, I route the wiring up out of the receiver instead of out the back.  I'll wire it to deans later.

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Another look at what needs to be done.  Since there's a gearbox in the way, a large portion of real steel stock needs to go.

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The top of my MPi stock appears to be curved inward toward where the top of the tang slides into the stock.  It's a little ugly, but that's the way the stock is, so I am simply going to deal with it.  A top down view of what needs to be hacked off.

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Bottom view.  Note the single screw on the LCT Stock.  The goal is to make the MPi stock fit so snug that you won't have to drill out a hole for this screw, as I have done over the course of this guide.

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Clamp your stock down to a nice solid table, and break out the hack saw.

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Now, I'm no carpenter, as such, I'm impressed that the cut is only this terrible:

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Better to leave behind too much, than not enough.  This will get trimmed up once I get the stock tang fitting properly.

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Here lies pain in the **** one.  The top part of the tang is perfect as is.  The boxy bottom part needs to be accommodated.  Break out your dremel, power drill, files, and elbow grease.

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Lots of cutting and fitting.  The stock tang part is just over 3.5mm deep, so you've got to clear out 3.5mm worth of material.  A note: If you plan on wiring your gun to the stock, this makes the whole process a lot easier, since you'll be able to pass the wiring through the gaping hole you're about to create.

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He's happy now, he really is.

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Not fitting anytime soon.  A lot more drilling and dremeling!

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The drill helps widen the hole in the stock.

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Getting there.  The dremel makes the plastic smoke and melt.  Be careful and make sure you're wearing eyepro!

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Making progress.  Remember, snug is better than loose!

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The hole is big enough to get my hobby file/rasp in there.  The nice part about the stock is it collects all the shavings in one convenient place!

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The hole for the stock tang is good to go.  Now it's time to trim up the remains of the stock so it fits inside the receiver.  A lot will need to come off of that bottom part.

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Alternating between the dremel and the rasp, file down the nub till it looks similar to that on the original LCT stock.

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The rasp and the dremel are your friends here.  Slowly trim away the excess material until it starts looking like the LCT Stock.  Also note that you should be test fitting the stock every few minutes.  Removing too much will make it wobbly, and you'll hate yourself if you mess up.

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Here's that curved part of the original stock.  It's not squared off like the airsoft stock.  It will look bad once properly assembled.

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So Close!

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The original screw hole on the MPi stock lines up with the LCT stock tang screw hole.  Mission accomplished.

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Be careful not to nick the side of the stock with the files or dremel.  You will hate yourself.  With a tiny bit more filing I could get this to line up perfect.

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The bottom has a bit of an overhang.  I assume the MPi receiver is just 1mm taller than an airsoft receiver.

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Those curved parts again.  Note that I am holding the gun by the stock, and there's no screw in the stock tang.  That's perfect for me.

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Filing the screw hole larger.  It is a machine screw, as such, won't self tap or anything.

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I ended up using a slightly larger drill bit to widen the hole to accommodate the LCT stock screw.  I did not drill a hole for the bottom screw.  It is rock solid.

And now, some Mission Accomplished Porn.

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Things left to do:

Obtain East German Night Sights
Obtain East German Sling
Obtain LCT Brown Pistol Grip
Obtain East German Type 1 Bayonet
Throw the setup in a weapon rack in the armory at East Wind 6!

I hope this guide helps those of you working on rifles for the upcoming East Wind.  It is a little involved, and takes a bit of patience, but as mentioned, this took me 4 hours, 3 and a half if you don't count the lunch break in the middle.

Enjoy!

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 Post subject: Re: MPi-KM-72 Conversion Guide (Pic heavy)
PostPosted: Sun Dec 02, 2012 8:35 pm 
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Ryadovoi
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Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2011 5:02 pm
Posts: 303
Awesome! =)

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 Post subject: Re: MPi-KM-72 Conversion Guide (Pic heavy)
PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 1:09 am 
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Prizivnik
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Joined: Tue Dec 15, 2009 12:34 am
Posts: 333
Location: Lockport,NY
AA-OK has the sights and sling http://aa-ok.com/ak-mags-accessories.html

BUNK has the bayonet http://knives.budk.com/search?form_stat ... &w=bayonet

hope this helps

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